Category Archives: Fasteners and Alloys

Engine Fasteners: An In-Depth Look at What Keeps Your Car Together

From Hot Rod, author: Marlan Davis October 11, 2019 Read Original Article >

Part 1: A Fastener-Ating Look At The Bolts And Studs That Hold Your Engine Together—We’d Really Be Screwed Without Them!

Bolts, nuts, and washers: They’re what keeps your engine, drivetrain, chassis—heck, the entire car—together. Fasteners are the linchpin for a successful build—but how much attention do you really pay to them? Sure, we want our nuts and bolts to look pretty and not rust, but they’re much more than just another pretty face! Failure of a single critical engine or chassis fastener can cost you tens of thousands of bucks, due to a destroyed engine, or even an entire car. Yet with proper selection and installation practices, you can virtually eliminate fastener failure. Over the next few months, we’re going to take a granular look at today’s fastener technology with the help of Chris Raschke and the Automotive Racing Products (ARP) crew. Unless you’ve been living in a cave the last 20 years, you know that the good folks at ARP have risen to become the dominant force in supplying bulletproof fasteners for just about every hot rod and motorsport application. In this installment, we’ll look at fasteners retained primarily in tension, concentrating on those used to hold your engine together. What are their unique materials and characteristics, how are they made, and how do you properly install them?  Go to Original Article >

CUSTOM BOLTS AND FASTENERS FOR ENGINE MANUFACTURING

Time to fight corrosion for the environment’s sake

By Nimeka de Silva and Patrik Lundström Törnquist – November 24,2019 See original article >

The global cost of corrosion exceeds US$2.5 trillion annually, or three percent of global GDP. Moreover, the environmental consequences are enormous. Innovative premium high-strength and high-performance stainless steel fasteners offer significant benefits – from product and asset infrastructure maintenance to total lifecycle costs – in many global industry sectors.

Metallic corrosion is the result of electro-chemical interaction between a metal and substances present within its operating environment. Corrosion results in degradation of that material, to the point where it is no longer mechanically or structurally fit for purpose. Corrosion presents a formidable global challenge. It affects many everyday products and almost all infrastructure – through increased maintenance, shorter product lifecycles, end-of-life management and generally the overall utilization of more resources over a product’s lifetime.

The economic and environmental impact is significant, and it is high time to place the fight against corrosion in a proper sustainability context.

The International Measures of Prevention, Application and Economics of Corrosion Technology (IMPACT) study by NACE estimates the global cost of corrosion to be US$ 2.5 trillion annually – equivalent to around three per cent of global GDP in 2018. However, it also estimates that existing corrosion control practices could save 15-35 percent of the cost of corrosion, equating to between US$ 375 and US$ 875 billion globally each year (NACE International, 2016).

Corrosion impacts heavily on the environment

The consequences of corrosion-related impacts on the environment are not included in this study but are increasingly important. In response to greater interest in issues related to environmental impact and sustainability, engineers are ever more encouraged to design products and infrastructure that can minimize negative environmental and societal impact. Sustainability in design, optimizing a product’s lifecycle, minimizing maintenance requirements and end-of-life upcycling/recycling for example are all becoming an important part of product performance, quality and overall cost.

In future, it is very likely that we will see even more burden placed on product manufacturers and asset infrastructure owners towards end-of-life management, so making early considerations in the design and planning stage will become a more crucial aspect of engineering. Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs) are becoming ever more important for any product or project from both a customer and regulator perspective.

More robust and cost-effective fastener solutions

Stainless steel fasteners have long been used in corrosive environments, such as within the oil & gas industry, chemical processing, marine and coastal applications. In recent years, stainless steel materials, predominantly austenitic grades A2 (304) and A4 (316), have become more readily available, largely due to low-cost high-volume Asian manufacturers.

However, interest in premium stainless steel and high-grade alloy fasteners has really taken off. Within the correct application, they offer improved product performance, reduced maintenance and can help to maximize the product lifecycle. Considering total lifecycle costs can help to deliver significant cost efficiencies over the lifespan of a product, rather than an approach focusing purely on the initial upfront cost.

Particularly in more technical industries where performance, safety and reliability are all critical factors, engineers are now starting to give more consideration to an ever-increasing range of fastener products and material options available to them, in an attempt to design more robust and long-term cost-effective products and infrastructure.

Traditional fastener challenges for engineers

One of the traditional limitations accepted by engineers when considering the use of stainless steel materials, is reduced mechanical strength compared with high tensile carbon steel. If a combination of high strength and corrosion resistance was required, then engineers may often resort to the use of high tensile carbon steel with an additional protective coating.

However, high tensile carbon steel brings with it the burden of finding a coating suitable for the application and the associated performance, quality and lifespan considerations for the coating. High tensile carbon steels are also prone to the risk of hydrogen embrittlement as a result of their manufacturing process. Engineers often express concerns regarding this risk and careful consideration should always be given during their production.

The solution – corrosion resistance and high strength

Enter premium high corrosion-resistance stainless steel fasteners. These are products that combine the corrosion resistance capabilities of different stainless steel material grades, with the strength of high tensile carbon steel (such as the BUMAX DX 129 range). In addition, ductility and fatigue properties are also considerably better, outperforming high tensile carbon steel. By eliminating the limitations of strength in stainless steel materials, these premium fasteners open up new possibilities for design engineers that require a combination of high mechanical performance and corrosion resistance.

Applications for these premium stainless steel fasteners include aerospace, offshore equipment, steel construction, high-end electric bikes, high pressure applications, fueling systems and semiconductor manufacturing equipment – all with excellent results. Many more applications may follow, to the benefit of not only the owners and users of products and infrastructure – with higher quality, reduced maintenance and longer lifespans – but also the entire planet with the potential for the more sustainable use of material resources.

Custom Fasteners

The Golden Bolt

As the number one source for custom fasteners, special bolts, standard fasteners and bolts, we play an integral part in the production process for our customers. We’re consistently called upon for custom nuts, bolts, and other products that are necessary to keep production running smoothly and efficiently. We’re so focused on providing our customers with the necessary products for their success that we continue to specialize in custom made products.

Countless manufacturers around the world are constantly creating, producing, and distributing products that are complex and require hundreds and sometimes even thousands of pieces. But did you know that bolts and related products usually only make up approximately three percent of the end cost of an item?

Think about this: A company is manufacturing huge industrial tractors for use in the agriculture industry. Thousands of pieces are needed to complete each tractor, including various metals, wheels, and other components. But in order for the tractor to be completed safely and efficiently, a number of important parts are necessary, including custom or off the shelf nuts and bolts.

At Chicago Nut and Bolt we offer our customers custom and off the shelf nut and bolt components quickly, efficiently, and conveniently. We know that keeping your production process moving smoothly and on schedule is important. Contact us to learn more about our emergency order services and more custom capabilities. We’re experts when it comes to custom nuts, bolts, and the important golden bolt in your production process.

Custom Bolts | Custom Fasteners | Chicago Bolts | Special Bolts | Large Diameter Bolts | Custom Nuts | Special Nuts | Special Fasteners

Get Low: Finding Fasteners for Low Temperature Applications

With the holidays upon us and the winter season approaching, it’s time to begin thinking about the colder weather. In our business, that means evaluating how fasteners will withstand the cold temperatures while maintaining their strength. Take, for example, Santa’s sleigh—all of the sleigh’s components need to handle the low temperatures, cold winds, and snow-covered roofs that they will be facing. What exactly needs to go into the design and development of these components?

When it comes to producing fasteners for low temperature applications, we focus on the alloys of the parts. Typically, the materials meet ASTM A320 specifications, meaning they are usually alloy steel or stainless steel and conform to a certain chemical composition. This enables them to maintain specific characteristics they need to work in the cold, including corrosion resistance, tensile strength, and ductility.

Maintaining certain strength is essential in low temperature applications. Santa’s sleigh needs to stay aloft, pipeline uses need to remain intact, ski lifts or ski towers need to remain standing. Whatever the application, structures that are exposed to low and harsh temperatures need to be ductile and secure. For these applications, strong alloys, such as steel or stainless steel, are usually options that stand strong.